CANTER

L'équitation et le cheval au petit galop...Exposer et échanger les méthodes d'éducation et de dressage du cheval: dans leur diversité, tenter d'identifier les dénominateurs communs aux approches, aux disciplines, mais surtout aux individus
 
AccueilAccueil  PortailPortail  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Variation de composition de l'herbe

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
pascaleW58
Vieux Tromblon
avatar

Messages : 2335
Date d'inscription : 21/09/2007
Localisation : Dijon

MessageSujet: Variation de composition de l'herbe   Lun 15 Mar 2010 - 23:02

Un extrait d'article qui vous intéressera peut être (j'ai juste ce morceau, le lien vers l'article entier ne fonctionne plus et je n'en ai pas gardé de copie...).

Pour ceux qui ne lisent pas l'anglais, ça dit en gros que l'herbe peut changer rapidement de composition selon les conditions climatiques. En particulier, sa teneur en potassium peut beaucoup augmenter (typiquement si gelées la nuit et temps plus doux mais sec la journée >>> bienvenue au mois de mars...).

L'excès de potassium peut avoir des conséquences très néfastes, voire mortelles...

J'avais lu ailleurs (dans la suite de l'article ?) que c'était l'une des raisons de mettre à disposition à temps complet une pierre à sel. Dans mon souvenir (à prendre avec précaution) : le potassium prendra la place du sodium s'il y a carence en sodium >> cela mène à un dysfonctionnement (pathologique) de l'organisme.

*Grass is a living breathing organism (it just breathes carbon di oxide rather than oxygen) and it changes hour to hour - if the grass "thinks" it is going to die or have less chance of survival, it conserves and prepares - just as we would. Conservation of water would be a likely action.
Grass does this by actually drawing potassium up from the ground, and if the soil is heavily fertilized it can draw a lot, because a major part of fertilizer is potassium. Potassium allows the plant to attract more water.
This is good for farmers who sell hay and crops by the pound but bad for the
actual nutritional value, because the grass, crop of whatever is mostly just water. Devastation can occur if horses, cattle or other creatures are exposed to too much potassium at one time. If you are a cattleman, I am sure you are familiar with grass tetany and milk fever, and the sudden death associated with its occurrence. These were once thought to be magnesium and calcium deficiencies. We now know it is from high potassium forages and grasses.

Similar situations causing abortions and gut problems often occur in horses.
What happens is that the potassium spikes during cool wet conditions and especially after long droughts followed by rainfall and rapid growth. Situations like frost and freezing are especially bad - have you ever had a horse colic after frost? Probably so . the reason is a sudden mineral change in the grass, not just frozen grass. During these times sodium, calcium and magnesium decrease, while potassium increases.
This spike in potassium is often deadly. A major problem like this occurred in 2001 in the
Midwest where reproductive losses occurred in thousands of horses, cattle , sheep and goats. This was severe in Kentucky as well.

Often cattle were found dead just a few hours after frost and freezes. Mineral
blocks just cannot provide the minerals for such rapid changes in weather.*
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Epona
Militant
avatar

Messages : 412
Date d'inscription : 21/09/2007

MessageSujet: a recopier   Mar 16 Mar 2010 - 10:38

igw58 a écrit:
Un extrait d'article qui vous intéressera peut être (j'ai juste ce morceau, le lien vers l'article entier ne fonctionne plus et je n'en ai pas gardé de copie...).

.*[/i]

Moi non plus (pas gardé copie) et dieu sait si j'ai trouvé cet article intéressant !!!!

Ben à force de chercher.... J'ai fini par retrouver

Perfect Pastures
Dan Moore, DVM
The Natural Horse Vet®

Part One

Grass Muzzles for pasture horses – That’s crazy! Or is it? Grass muzzles are a hot item these days.
I see them at almost every equine event I attend. Truthfully, I almost laughed the fi rst time I saw one. Then I thought to myself “that is a great idea”, many horse owners today really need them. But why? For thousands of years wild horses have lived on grass alone and typically they ate all they wanted. There was no one to stop them, turn them out for only a few hours
at a time or worse yet MUZZLE them. Today, colic, allergies, metabolic issues, laminitis, hoof
and other health issues are often associated with eating too much grass. What is different about
today’s grass or perhaps what is different about the horse? Obviously a lot has changed! If we
truly look at the way it was and, “mimic” what’s natural, perhaps we can have healthier horses and avoid a lot of problems.

Today’s species of grasses are totally different from the past. Most horses today on pasture only have one or two varieties of grass –
usually timothy, orchard grass with some degree of clover and fescue. In the wild, they had access to vast areas of grass and abundant species.
Equally important was access to other plants and herbs. Today they eat what they have access to in the spaces we confi ne them to. Most species of grass (and even grain) today are genetically today are genetically modififi ed– a controversy and discussion all in itself.


By being able to “pick and choose” what they needed horses received a balance of nutrients.
For instance, as I am sure you know most horses will chew on tree bark. Of course it is bad for
the trees – totally inconsequential in the wilderness, but in the back yard pasture, chewed dead trees look awful! Simple sugars called
polysaccharides and amino acids like methionine and perhaps tannins are probably what they are
after by eating the trees. Regardless, if methionine is supplemented most horses have better hooves. Supplementing simple
polysaccharide sugars (not ref ned complex table sugar or syrup) will often help the gut (sometimes
stop cribbing and help ulcers, too) – the gut being the source of almost all problems in a horse. One such simple sugar in particular is
Arabinogalactan, obtained from the Western Larch tree. Another is Mannose – from the Aloe plant. The Native American Indians and “grandmas” everywhere have used these substances for centuries. In other parts of the world they may have used Noni fruit or Pomegranate or whatever was native to the area – and if horses were there had access to them,
be assured they ate the bark, fruit (or whatever) too! This is one of the reasons supplements are so important today – horses just can’t get all they need from the typical diets we give them, and the one or two species of grass they graze just doesn’t provide all they may need. There are most likely many ingredients or micronutrients
that we have not yet discovered. I believe we will someday classify polysaccharides as “ESSENTIAL” polysaccharides, just like there are essential amino acids, and essential fatty acids now.

The need for essential fatty acids like Omega 3, 6 and 9 are beginning to be more recognized
by horse owners today. In the wild, horses can pick and choose seeds and grass heads from
various grasses and plants to get the fatty acids they need – in our care they take what we give them – unfortunately, until recently they have received very little. For the most part, they just receive sugars (like from corn and molasses),
which, as we know, turns to fat but are not essential fatty acids. Today high fat is “in” but again we must be careful. The easy thing to do is
buy cheap fat like REFINED or partially hydrogenated oils (corn oil for instance). The problem with any refi ned oil is that all the “goody” is fi ltered out and sold for other purposes. Hydrogenated oils are more stable and less likely to spoil or go rancid, which is why
they are used in almost every snack food, but they actually harden and damage cells within the body and make tissue less pliable. This can actually make a situation like insulin resistance or metabolic disease (which are often the clinical problems that trigger the need for fats to be supplemented in the fi rst place) to be even more
of a problem. “Hardened” cells don’t respond to insulin and other “metabolic reactions” like more
pliable cells would. Over time “hydrogenation” causes premature aging because more and more
insulin must be produced and the body’s cells become more and more damaged.
One of the main purposes of insulin is to regulate sugar. The grain we feed our horses (corn, especially, and molasses) and the “richer”, single variety grasses in our pastures (and snack foods for us)
also cause more and more insulin to
be secreted. With time, this causes “insulin resistance” – requiring more and more insulin to get the job done. The higher the resting insulin overall, the quicker all species age and subsequently die - period! High resting insulin is rarely detected because usually just blood glucose is checked. Simply relying on
blood glucose (sugar) levels alone is not enough – sugar or blood glucose can be normal but resting insulin levels can be extremely elevated - even high enough to kill you or your horse. Many horses (and people) are insulin resistant with high resting levels of insulin, but because
the body is such a miraculous machine it is still keeping the sugar normal. Most fat and overweight “easy keepers” are insulin resistant. Certainly hypothyroid, Cushings, and chronic recurring laminitis or foundered horses fi t this category as well. Lush green grass or stress (as in
people) is often associated with, and generally what gets blamed for acute occurrences - but the underlying metabolic situation is usually at cause. Horses need good fats not sugars!


By now it should be clear that except in a free wild range situation with thousands of acres, it is impossible to have a perfect pasture today - but there is a “next to perfect” answer to the perfect pasture question! A perfect pasture is one that has a bucket (free choice access) of natural salt and naturally sourced minerals hanging in it –AT ALL TIMES. And I stress NATURAL source here and at ALL times. Even white salt
and most minerals are chemical, often other industry’s leftovers, full of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, arsenic, aluminum, mercury). And salt blocks are just simply useless because horses are not lickers –they can not get all of what they need from blocks – period! They just can’t lick fast enough! Once again – in the wild horses, have access to all types of salt and minerals where they can pick and choose and balance themselves as needed. Today we fortify the feeds
with various minerals and fortify our pastures with fertilizer. The problem here is that we may actually be causing an imbalance of nutrition.


Perfect Pastures
Dan Moore, DVM
The Natural Horse Vet®

Part Two

Mineral supplements though well intentioned, may give them too much of what they don’t need. Hoof supplements are especially bad for this – massive amounts often, chosen by man and based on a RDA (recommended daily allowance standard) that is 15 years old or
more. Natural minerals and salt like colloidal minerals and sea salt (often from desert sources that used to be the ocean millions of years ago)
contain other micronutrients as well, and are balanced by mother nature not by man. The confusing issue here is that if you compare
mineral amounts to man-made products, natural sources often look like they contain very low levels. But what they do contain is so
much more usable or bio-available that it packs a much greater, yet balanced, punch! They literally contain every nutrient and mineral
that was once in the “living oceans”. Often with man-made our horses over-consume what they don’t need while trying to get what they
do need. AND what they really need may not even be in the mix because man is not aware of it – Natural is better!


Pasture horses must have access to loose salt and minerals at all times. If they don’t, they can colic, founder, abort and die almost without
warning. It all comes back to the health of the horse’s gut. Any sudden change, as we well know, can be disastrous. Obvious concerns are
getting too much grain or sudden exposure to lush green grass – but a weather change without free access to loose salt and minerals can be just
as deadly to a pasture horse. Grass is a living breathing organism (it just breaths carbon dioxide rather than oxygen) and its changes
hour to hour – if the grass “thinks” it is going to die or has less chance of survival it conserves and prepares – just like we would. Conservation
of water would be a likely action. Grass does this by actually drawing potassium up from the ground, and if the soil is heavily fertilized, it can
draw a lot, because a major part of fertilizer is potassium. Potassium allows the plant to attract more water. This is good for farmers who sell
hay and crops by the pound but bad for the actual nutritional value because the grass, crop or whatever is mostly just water. Devastation
can occur if horses, cattle or other creatures are exposed to too much potassium at one time. If you are a cattleman, I am sure you are familiar
with Grass Tetany and Milk Fever, and the sudden death associated with its occurrence.
These were once thought to be magnesium and calcium defi ciencies. We now know it is from high potassium forages and grasses. Similar
situations causing abortions and gut problems often occur in horses. What happens is that the potassium spikes during cool, wet conditions
and especially after long droughts followed by rainfall and rapid growth. Situations like frost and freezing are especially bad – have
you ever had horse colic after a frost? Probably so…the reason is a sudden mineral change in the grass, not just frozen grass! During these
times sodium, calcium and magnesium decrease, while potassium increases. This spike in potassium is often deadly. A major problem
like this occurred in 2001 in the Midwest where reproductive losses occurred in thousands of horses, cattle, sheep and goats. This was severe
in Kentucky. as well. Often cattle were found dead just a few hours after frost and freezes.
Mineral blocks just cannot provide the minerals fast enough for such rapid changes in weather.
Free choice, loose salt and minerals must be available to pasture horses at all times if such problems are to be prevented! It is also important to consider that since sodium (the Na part of NaCl, or salt) is so similar to potassium, horses often think they have enough sodium (but really have too much potassium) so they stop eating salt. This is especially so in the winter when they need it most. Force-feeding salt is a viable solution particularly in pregnant
mares. This should be in addition to making it readily available free choice. (Always be sure to put any salt product near readily available water). One further point is that fescue alone is usually blamed for abortions in mares when
it is actually the fungus like organisms on the fescue that cause the problems. BUT again it is elevated potassium that generally makes these organisms more deadly! The bottom line here is that less fertilize is better and fescue should be avoided for pregnant mares. It would also seem obvious to me to avoid hay that has been grown on heavily fertilized fi elds – especially for pregnant mares.Now, the big question is how can I make my fields better if I can’t fertilize? The answer is to avoid the typical types of fertilizers – those that are salt based. Salt fertilizers are destroying our environment as well as our soils. Year after year of fertilizer use kills benefi cial earthworms
that oxygenate the soil with their tunnels. Lack of oxygen kills the soil just like it would us. Fortunately, there are “time tested” ways to fertilize that are often even more economical and certainly more benefi cial.

Unfortunately because of all the “politics” involved, major universities seldom teach their use. One of the healthiest ways to make good pastures and again, often the most economical is to heavily lime your fi elds twice per year. Lime is Calcium Carbonate. Calcium keeps the soil basic rather than acid. Basic soil is healthy just as a more basic body pH is healthier for people. Calcium in the form of lime is cheap and I promise if you have many weeds at all growing in your pasture you need lime. Don’t expect immediate
results however, because it takes time for lime to be absorbed and utilized, but it will help tremendously over time. While your pastures are improving it is important to supplement the diet. Most horses I have found, at least in the eastern US, are calcium defi cient. Typically soils in the western United States contain more calcium – which is why the buffalo once fl ourished there and not in the east. Tremendous
calcium is needed for the buffalo’s huge bones. For many years now, ring neck pheasants have not grown in the southeastern United States either, simply because there is not enough calcium in the soil to support their egg shells. Most horses have plenty of phosphorous in their diets, so I don’t worry too much about balancing the calcium to hosphorus ratio. An exception would be older horses, which occasionally can use more phosphorus.


The answer to perfect pastures is simple
– do not use fertilizer and if you do, use liquid, non salt types, plenty of lime for the pasture and keep a bucket full of NATURAL salt and minerals readily available to your horses at all times! Consider the use of crude unrefi ned
essential fatty acids because horses today just can’t get them naturally and because they are so important to overall health. One final suggestion: if your horse does not have access to grass, such as in the winter, or if the grass is poor, always supplement with Beta Carotene. Green
grass generally provides plenty of Beta Carotene (vitamin A, by the way, is not enough) but hay provides hardly any. Beta Carotene is crucial for reproductive health, lactation, immune function and hundreds of other benefi ts. I believe it too will be considered “essential” in the future.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.lepreauxlucioles.be
pascaleW58
Vieux Tromblon
avatar

Messages : 2335
Date d'inscription : 21/09/2007
Localisation : Dijon

MessageSujet: Re: Variation de composition de l'herbe   Mar 16 Mar 2010 - 15:29

Epona a écrit:

Moi non plus (pas gardé copie) et dieu sait si j'ai trouvé cet article intéressant !!!!

Ben à force de chercher.... J'ai fini par retrouver

Merci Epona

Tu as le lien vers la source sur le web ? (celle que j'avais conservée ne fonctionne plus...).
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Epona
Militant
avatar

Messages : 412
Date d'inscription : 21/09/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Variation de composition de l'herbe   Mar 16 Mar 2010 - 15:43

igw58 a écrit:
Epona a écrit:

Moi non plus (pas gardé copie) et dieu sait si j'ai trouvé cet article intéressant !!!!

Ben à force de chercher.... J'ai fini par retrouver

Merci Epona

Tu as le lien vers la source sur le web ? (celle que j'avais conservée ne fonctionne plus...).

J'ai même fait mieux pour ceux qui causent pas l'english...

De nos jours, les coliques, les allergies, la fourbure et bien d’autres problèmes de santé peuvent être associés à l’alimentation de nos chevaux.

La question est donc de comprendre exactement ce qui provoque ces différentes maladies afin d’avoir des chevaux en meilleure santé.

La gestion des pâtures d’aujourd’hui est totalement différente de ce qui se faisait dans le passé. Nous n’avons plus accès qu’à quelques espèces de végétaux : habituellement ray-grass, fétuque, fléole et un peu de trèfle. Les chevaux mangent donc ce qui leur est accessible dans l’espace dans lequel on les confine.

Les chevaux sauvages ont – pour leur part – accès à une abondance d’espèces végétales réparties sur de larges territoires. En ayant la possibilité de choisir ce dont ils ont besoin, les chevaux équilibrent leur ration.

Il leur arrive par exemple de mordre dans des écorces dans lesquels ils trouvent, entre-autre, des sucres simples appelés polysaccharides, des acides aminés tels la méthionine et probablement des tanins. On sait déjà qu’avec la méthionine, la qualité de la corne est de meilleure qualité. Les intestins – et donc le système digestif est amélioré grâce aux polysaccharides (non raffinés) qui aideraient même en cas d’ulcères.

La principale raison pour laquelle les compléments alimentaires sont tellement importants est donc que les chevaux n’ont pas accès à tout ce dont ils ont besoin et qu’ils trouvaient dans la nature.

Il y a probablement de nombreux ingrédients ou micronutriments qu’on n’a pas encore découvert. On commence à reconnaitre les bénéfices sur la santé (humaine comme équine) d’acides gras tels les Oméga 3, 6 et 9.

Jusqu’à il y a peu, les chevaux recevaient une nourriture basique. Pour la plupart ils recevaient un peu de sucre sous forme de mélasse qui, comme nous le savons, se transforme en graisse mais ne contient aucun acide gras.

Aujourd’hui la tendance est à donner de l’huile à nos chevaux. Mais là aussi la prudence s’impose dans le sens ou l’huile bon marché, raffinée, « hydrogénée » ne contient plus tout les nutriments intéressants. Ces huiles hydrogénées sont plus stables et rancissent moins vite, mais elles peuvent abimer les cellules et provoquer leur vieillissement prématuré, provoquant même une situation identique à de la résistance à l’insuline.

Une des raisons d’être de l’insuline est de réguler le taux de sucre dans le sang.

Les mélanges avec lequel nous nourrissons nos chevaux (tout particulièrement ceux qui contiennent du mais et de la molasse) et les variétés d’herbes qu’on trouve dans nos prairies sont la cause d’une sécrétion de plus en plus grande d’insuline.

Avec le temps une résistance à l’insuline s’installe – et le besoin d’une quantité de plus en plus grande est nécessaire pour « faire le boulot ». La conséquence étant un vieillissement prématuré.

Le taux élevé d’insuline est rarement détecté parce qu’on teste juste le glucose dans le sang et que ce n’est pas suffisant. La fourbure chronique, la maladie de Cushing, etc., en découlent.

Un prairie luxuriante (ou le stress) est souvent désignée comme étant LA coupable mais c’est plutôt du côté de la situation métabolique qu’on devrait plutôt chercher la cause.

Les chevaux ont besoin de bonnes graisses, pas de sucre !
.
Il est clair qu’il est impossible d’avoir une prairie parfaite, mais on peut tenter de s’en approcher.

La première chose à faire est d’y laisser à disposition en permanence un complément minéral et du sel naturel (par exemple sel de Guérande).

Les minéraux (colloïdaux) et sels de mer contiennent plein de micronutriments qui se trouvaient dans les océans, base de toute vie ; ils sont équilibrés, complets et bio-disponibles.

Les produits industriels sont bien souvent des « restes » dans lesquels il n’est pas rare de trouver du plomb, cadmium, arsenic, aluminium, mercure….

La santé du cheval passe par ses intestins. Tout changement, comme on le sait, peut-être désastreux. Trop de grain, de l’herbe trop riche sans y avoir été habitué peuvent provoquer de sérieux dégâts. Mais ce qu’on sait moins, c’est qu’un changement de temps (climat) sans accès au sel et minéraux peut-être tout aussi désastreux.

L’herbe est un organisme vivant qui respire (Il respire du dioxyde de carbone) et évolue d’heure en heure. Si l’herbe est en danger, qu’elle à moins de chance de survivre, elle se prépare à se protéger.

Pour ce faire elle absorbe le potassium du sol pour conserver son eau. Si le sol est bien fertilisé elle peut en pomper un maximum, car la plus grande partie de nos engrais est composé de potassium.

Le potassium permet à la plante d’attirer plus d’eau. C’est bon pour le fermier qui vend son foin au kilo mais mauvais pour les valeurs nutritionnelles parce que l’herbe ou la récolte est composée en grande majorité par de l’eau.

Si les chevaux, bovins ou autres herbivores sont exposés à trop de potassium d’un coup, c’est la catastrophe. Avortements, problèmes intestinaux arrivent souvent chez les chevaux.

Mais que se passe-t-il s’il y a un pic de potassium pendant une période froide et humide, spécialement après une longue période de sécheresse suivie de pluie et d’une pousse rapide de l’herbe ?

Les périodes de givre et de gel sont particulièrement mauvaises. Vous connaissez certainement les coliques de gel…

La raison en est un soudain changement minéral dans l’herbe. Ce n’est pas dû juste au fait que l’herbe est gelée. Pendant cette période le taux de sodium, de calcium et de magnésium diminuent alors que le taux de potassium augmente. Ce pic de potassium est souvent mortel !

Les blocs de sel tels qu’on les trouve dans le commerce ne peuvent pas fournir suffisamment de minéraux pour des changements climatiques aussi rapides. C’est pour cela qu’un complément minéral + sel naturel en vrac et doit être disponible.

Il faut aussi savoir que le sodium est très similaire au potassium. Les chevaux pensent qu’ils ont assez de sodium alors qu’en fait ils ont trop de potassium et ils cessent de se complémenter en sel. Particulièrement en hiver quand ils en ont le plus grand besoin.

On conseille alors de forcer leur consommation de sel (particulièrement les juments gestantes)

Il faut aussi surtout éviter les engrais habituels. Ce qui est bon pour le bétail ne convient pas aux chevaux !

Comment donc peut-on améliorer nos prairies ?
En chaulant (calcium carbonate) 2 fois par an. La chaux garde le sol basique plutôt qu’acide. Un sol basique est plus sain ; de plus la chaux est économique (pour ma part j’utilise du lithotame) . Elle prend du temps pour être absorbée et utilisée par le sol mais c’est tout avantage pour sa composition. Le résultat le plus visible sera la disparition des « mauvaises » herbes. Un des avantages non-négligeable, sera de balancer le fameux ratio calcium/phosphore de l’alimentation de vos chevaux.

En résumé pour avoir une prairie parfaite :

Pas d’engrais, mais si vous devez vraiment en utiliser, optez plutôt pour de l’engrais liquide, de type non salé. (je présume qu'on parle de "sels de...")


Usez et abusez de la chaux et gardez un seau plein de sel et de complément minéral naturel en vrac.

Préférez les huiles première pression non raffinées.

Dernière suggestion :
Si vos chevaux n’ont pas accès aux prairies en hiver, supplémentez les en beta-carotène.
L’herbe en contient tout plein (vitamine A n’est pas suffisante), mais le foin n’en contient quasi pas !

La beta-carotène est essentielle pour la reproduction, la lactation, la réponse immunitaire entre autre.

Source : Perfect Pastures - Dan Moore, DVM
http://www.equestriandays.com/Perfect-Pasture-1.shtml
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.lepreauxlucioles.be
Katia
Déchainé
avatar

Messages : 961
Date d'inscription : 18/01/2009
Age : 46
Localisation : Landes

MessageSujet: Re: Variation de composition de l'herbe   Mar 16 Mar 2010 - 22:47

1000 fois merci Epona!
Pour la traduction, c'est vraiment génial, je cause plus l'anglais depuis le bac...

Un truc qui m'interpelle, à propos du sel. Katia met un point d'honneur à ne pas toucher aux pierres à sel. J'ai essayé différentes sortes, puis j'ai laissé tomber. Actuellement, elle a une pierre à sel + minéraux dans son boxe, totalement neuve. J'avais même mis la ration dans le seau de la pierre, pour voir, ben elle a boudé sa ration... Message très clair.
J'y prète pas attention plus que ça, me disant qu'elle n'en a tout simplement pas besoin. Elle est au foin (10 à 15kg facile), et 2 l de floconné matin et soir.
Mais du coup, je me tenterai bien le sel de guérande, carrément dans la ration en petite dose.
Ou alors, acheter dans le commerce des CMV en granules.
Vous en pensez quoi?
Est ce que vous même vous complémentez vos chevaux? Avec quoi? Quand? Et pourquoi?
Ca vaudrait le coup de créer un post spécial, du coup.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
pomme de pin
Militant
avatar

Messages : 476
Date d'inscription : 22/12/2009
Localisation : Creuse

MessageSujet: Re: Variation de composition de l'herbe   Mar 16 Mar 2010 - 22:57

igw58 et Epona : merci pour ces textes, c'est vraiment intéressant (bon, c'est vrai que la traduction ça aide, mais à force de lire des trucs en anglais sur le net, j'ai fait vachement de progrès ! )

Katia : en attendant de te décider, tu peux toujours commencer par le sel de Guérande (ou autre sel de mer gris non traité, sans aucun additif ). C'est pas cher, ça se trouve dans le moindre petit supermarché du coin, tu en laisses 1 ou 2 poignées à disposition dans un seau à l'abri de la pluie, tu verras bien si ça la tente ou pas.

Et si ça ne lui plaît pas ou que tu optes finalement pour un autre complément, le reste du paquet de sel est facile à recycler dans ta cuisine !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.equidynamie.fr
Katia
Déchainé
avatar

Messages : 961
Date d'inscription : 18/01/2009
Age : 46
Localisation : Landes

MessageSujet: Re: Variation de composition de l'herbe   Mar 16 Mar 2010 - 23:11

C'est clair, le sel de guérande sera pas perdu pour tout le monde! Je vais commencer par ça.
Au fait, j'ai créé le post dans "soins courants"!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Epona
Militant
avatar

Messages : 412
Date d'inscription : 21/09/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Variation de composition de l'herbe   Mer 17 Mar 2010 - 11:52

pomme de pin a écrit:
igw58 et Epona : merci pour ces textes, c'est vraiment intéressant (bon, c'est vrai que la traduction ça aide, mais à force de lire des trucs en anglais sur le net, j'ai fait vachement de progrès ! )


De rien !
Il est bien vrai qu'une passion aide grandement à faire des progrès dans certaines langues, quand on y met un peu du sien, bien sur....
Rien de tel qu'un sujet qui nous tient à coeur
Les profs de langue devraient en tenir compte....
Wink

Pour Katia
Je me fournissais chez Cevalino... Il a de très chouettes produits
Pour la culture de levure, j'ai trouvé le grossiste... et vais le vendre en Belgique
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.lepreauxlucioles.be
Gaëllemic
Vieux Tromblon
avatar

Messages : 1421
Date d'inscription : 24/09/2007
Age : 42
Localisation : proximité Dijon

MessageSujet: Re: Variation de composition de l'herbe   Mer 17 Mar 2010 - 11:55

Oui, merci à vous !! C'est vraiment très intéressant !!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Variation de composition de l'herbe   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Variation de composition de l'herbe
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Variation de composition de l'herbe
» Variation quotidienne de poids... Retention d'eau
» Maladie de l'herbe
» Quelle est la valeur nutritive de l'herbe ?
» Têtes plombées anti herbe

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
CANTER :: Connaissance & gestion du cheval :: Entretien, alimentation, soins courants-
Sauter vers: